Category Archives: Managing Indigenous Organisations

Building Organisational Resilience

Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander organisations are constantly dealing with crises and organisational stress; more than most other not-for-profit organisations and commercial businesses. At the edge of financial viability, they face funding pressure, changing Government policies, the weight of community expectations, and the pressure of “walking two worlds” in governance and management. Many Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander organisations operate in remote locations for constituents whose first language is not necessarily English, where finding and retaining capable staff is a constant struggle, let alone training local community members in the administrative, financial and management jobs. It is not surprising then to hear that as an organisation, they struggle with resilience and sustainability. A resilient organisation should be able to withstand shock, crisis, pressure, and stress, and bounce back quickly to effective performance levels. Many have developed characteristics that allow this to happen. (more…)...
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“Culturally-Matched” Governance Makes Indigenous Organisations More Resilient

OTS Management has summarised our 35-year experience in working with Indigenous organisations and recorded our observations about how Indigenous organisations become resilient and prepared a free Whitepaper called The Building Blocks of Organisational Resilience. It will be no surprise that we have identified governance as one of those building blocks. However, we have also identified that the type of governance model implemented cannot be only focused on the governance processes legislated in various corporation Acts. While incorporated organisations must follow and not be in breach of legislated governance responsibilities, strong resilient organisations have found a way to incorporate "cultural match" in their governance processes. (more…)...
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The Strategic Planning Process

One of the most important forward-looking initiatives any Indigenous organisation can take is to prepare a definitive strategic plan, looking at least 5 years ahead. A strategic plan sets the strategic direction of the organisation and translates the organisation's vision into a roadmap over the next few years, showing how it will carry out its mission. Without a clear, documented strategic plan, your priorities will change from time to time depending on external stimuli at the time. You will not have clear milestones against which to measure progress, nor will you have measurements on whether or not you are fulfilling the mandates provided by your members. With a strategic plan you can look clearly ahead at least 5 years and set targets as goals, ensuring that each year, you are moving toward ultimately achieving your organisation's vision and purpose. (more…)...
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Prioritising Risks During Risk Management Planning

In Risk Management Planning, you take 6 steps in order to prepare a Risk Management Plan for your organisation, to be prepared for the risks that face your organisation. The 6 steps are:
  1. Identify all the risks
  2. Assess the risks
  3. Map the risks into a Risk Matrix
  4. Create strategies to manage the risks
  5. Manage the Risk Management Plan itself
  6. Monitor, test and evaluate
However, when we identify all the risks, the list is likely to be a long list and potentially overwhelming. It is impossible to do everything at once, so there must be a method to prioritise the risks that you have identified and create suitable prioritised strategies. (more…)...
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